Search Name:    
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Abdel Wahab Badrakhan

Mr. Abdel Wahab Badrakhan began his career in journalism in 1973 as an apprentice at the Beirut-based An-Nahar daily. During that period, he was assigned to cover student activities. These vigorous activities eventually transformed into physical battles between political parties.

When the civil war erupted in Lebanon and daily life in general and at universities in particular came to a halt, journalism was the only activity, apart from fighting, which was both possible and in demand. Caught in the midst of war, the reporter on student affairs, lacking any sort of military experience, covered the war while experiencing its most difficult circumstances and its gravest risks.

Thereafter, during the years of relative stability, Mr. Badrakhan continued his studies at the Lebanese University, where he received degrees in history and media studies. In 1979, he went to Paris to pursue his studies in media affairs.

However, when he was assigned by the An-Nahar al-Dawli wal Arabi magazine in 1980 to cover the Russian invasion of Afghanistan, he was lured back to journalism. He later moved to Pakistan to investigate the conditions of the Afghani Mujahideen in their forced exile.

Throughout his extensive coverage of international news, Mr. Badrakhan sought to complete his studies at the University of the Sorbonne, working on a thesis on the migrant Arab press. At the end of 1988, he joined the London-based Al-Hayat newspaper, which, in the course of a few years, emerged as a remarkable phenomenon in the domain of the Arab press.

Mr. Badrakhan was appointed Director of Al-Hayat Arab political section, later Managing Director, and Deputy Editor-in-Chief in 1998. During that period, he was one of the newspaper's commentators and analysts.

At present, Mr. Badrakhan is working on two books. The first book is on the roots of the experiences that have motivated young Arab men to go to Afghanistan. The second is devoted to Arab policies to counterterrorism, starting with the attacks of September 11, 2001 and covering the ensuing wars.